Policy & History

The Embassy of Guatemala is the diplomatic representation of the Government of Guatemala before the Government of the United States. Its main functions are to protect the interests of the State and its citizens; Maintain communication channels between the two governments, promote and promote trade relations and follow up on the issues of interest identified by both countries.

Following independence from Spain in 1821, Guatemala is part of the Federation of Central American States in 1823, along with Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and El Salvador. The United States recognized the Federation of Central America and diplomatic relations with Guatemala were officially established when President James Monroe received Antonio Jose Canaz as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary on August 4, 1824.

The American Legation in Guatemala was established on May 3, 1826, when Charge d’Affaires John Williams presented his credentials to the Federation of Central American States.

On May 4, 1943, the Legation of Guatemala in the United States was elevated to Embassy status with Adrian Recinos as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary.

Guatemala Independent was recognized on April 5, 1844 after the issuance of a catologist to the Guatemalan Antonio de Aycinena, Consul General. Diplomatic relations with Guatemala Independiente were established in 1849 when Chargé d’Affaires Elijah Hise presented his credentials to the Republic of Guatemala, the date or shortly before January 21, 1849.

After the government of Jacobo Arbenz was overthrown, on July 12, 1954 Secretary of State John Foster Dulles instructed the United States Embassy in Guatemala City to establish diplomatic relations with the new Government of Guatemala. The following day, Ambassador John E. Peurifoy informed Chancellor Salazar of the American recognition of the new Government of Guatemala.

Visit the following link with a guide on the history of the United States since 1776.